The Perennial - The design behind San Francisco's most sustainable restaurant

I'm a bit late to the game with this post because The Perennial has been making headlines since it opened it's doors back in January!   Karen and Anthony contacted me at the end of last year in need of images for their new restaurant.   When they contacted me and told me about the concept behind their newest venture (their previous ventures include Mission Chinese Food and Commonwealth) I happily jumped at the chance to shoot the new space located at 9th and Market.   

The Perennial focuses on sustainability from every angle from how their raw ingredients are sourced to their architecture and design (for more info on their awesome sustainability model visit SF Eater).

The Perennial was designed by Paul Discoe, who is also a master woodworker and works exclusively with reclaimed lumber. Paul Discoe Design built all of the wood in the space including the Douglas Fir bar, poplar chairs, cypress and black acacia tables, and posts made of wood recovered from the Transbay Terminal. (Insider tip: Paul also designed The Perennial’s aquaponic greenhouse located in Oakland near his studio). The dining room ceiling is woven from wood shavings produced during milling of the wooden posts.  The design team for the Perennial really did think of everything and their attention to sustainability is also present in the rug, tiling,  barstools, plaster,  glass, lighting, menus and even tableware (they feed their worn out napkins to their worms back the greenhouse)  For more info on the sources and design process you can visit The Perennial.  

 

The glass in the vestibule is made from bottles and jars from municipal recycling bins and internal recycling by Bendheim Glass.  The plaster wall was created with Rye Hudak from Level 5 Design and is made from marble-processing waste.   

The glass in the vestibule is made from bottles and jars from municipal recycling bins and internal recycling by Bendheim Glass.  The plaster wall was created with Rye Hudak from Level 5 Design and is made from marble-processing waste. 

 

In the center of the dining room, there is  a 100% recyclable rug, made by Interface from 100% recycled fibers. (Interface is currently experimenting with recycling used fishing nets into carpet fibers. Discarded fishing gear comprises about ten percent of all marine trash, according to the UN.) 

In the center of the dining room, there is  a 100% recyclable rug, made by Interface from 100% recycled fibers. (Interface is currently experimenting with recycling used fishing nets into carpet fibers. Discarded fishing gear comprises about ten percent of all marine trash, according to the UN.) 

The chefs table looks into the prep area of The Perennials kitchen which also features innovative energy effcient design and appliances.  The entire space is LEED certified. 

The chefs table looks into the prep area of The Perennials kitchen which also features innovative energy effcient design and appliances.  The entire space is LEED certified. 

The plates are made from a local (Mendocino) clay body by Jay and Rie Dion at Atelier Dion. The napkins are 100% cotton from local landmark Britex Fabrics and cleaned by a green laundry service

The plates are made from a local (Mendocino) clay body by Jay and Rie Dion at Atelier Dion. The napkins are 100% cotton from local landmark Britex Fabrics and cleaned by a green laundry service

Seating in the bar and the private dining room are Emeco's Alfi stools and chairs, made from 100% recycled materials.   

Seating in the bar and the private dining room are Emeco's Alfi stools and chairs, made from 100% recycled materials.